Is it possible to blend yoga and Catholicism? Ep. 46

January 26, 2018

In Signs of the Times, we talk Catholic dioceses suspending the sign of the peace due to flu outbreaks; priests in cassocks competing for the John Paul II Cup; and Pope Francis celebrating the marriage of two flight attendants during a papal flight.

“Going, Going, Gone: The Dynamics of Disaffiliation in Young Catholics” is a new study that seeks to understand why so many young Catholics leave the faith they were born into. We get into the study, our own experiences growing up in the church and some of the study’s most interesting findings. Should older married men become priests in order to serve isolated Catholic communities? Cardinal Beniamino Stella, of the Congregation for Clergy, says yes. Finally, we get into Pope Francis’ latest handling of sexual abuse allegations against clergy.

Make sure to leave us a review on Apple podcasts. If you already have, thank you! And don’t forget write us an email at, where you can share your own consolations and desolations or drink recipes, and follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow.

Links from the show:

Catholic diocese suspends ‘sign of peace’ due to flu

VIDEO: Priests in cassocks take part in annual skiing competition

Serving isolated parishes may mean ordaining married men, cardinal says

Study asks: Why are young Catholics going, going, gone?

Pope Francis explains why he celebrated the airborne marriage of two flight attendants

Pope Francis asks forgiveness from sexual abuse victims but reaffirms support for Bishop Barros

What’s on tap?


What do (Catholic) women want? Ep. 45

January 19, 2018

You have heard it said, “Who runs the world? Girls” (Bey 4:12). But we ask: Who runs the church? Popes, of course. But across the country there are dedicated women of faith taking the lead in parishes, schools, social ministries—and magazines. Our guest this week is one of them.

Kerry Weber is an executive editor at America and the driving force behind a groundbreaking new survey of U.S. Catholic women. We ask her why Catholic women are so often reluctant to claim the label of role model and what the church can do to lift up the important work women are already doing in the church.

Make sure to check out the new special issue on women in the church, which features Kerry’s piece, “The humble, indispensable women leading the Catholic Church you’ve (probably) never heard of,” plus tons of other great articles diving into the survey data.


And in Signs of the Times, Pope Francis says he is “truly afraid” of nuclear war—and how Catholics in Hawaii reacted when they thought that such a war was coming. Next, we discuss what America’s findings about the politics of U.S. Catholic women might mean for the 2018 midterm elections. Finally, we tackle the history of football’s “Hail Mary pass” and the question: Should church doors ever be locked?

Have you left us a review on iTunes yet? We’d be eternally grateful if you did. Please. Not that we’re desperate. If you already have, thank you! Do keep in touch: Write us an email at and follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow so you can take part in our unscientifically significant polls!

Links from the show

U.S. Catholic Women: What a New Survey Reveals

Pope Francis: “I am truly afraid” of nuclear war.

How our Confirmation students kept us calm during a false missile threat in Hawaii

Overall, the survey found that 59 percent of Catholic women are Democrats or lean Democratic, whereas 38 percent are Republican or lean Republican. (Those numbers decrease to 41 percent Roger Staubach, Drew Pearson hope Vikings’ miracle play makes up for 1975 Hail Mary

Catholic bishop says churches should stay open like the Church of England

What’s on tap?

(Modified) Elderflower Thistle

2 ounces of Jameson, an ounce of St. Germain and a dash of Angostura bitters, over ice. (The original recipe calls for Scotch. Apparently, Irish whiskey is not, in fact, the same thing as Scotch. You live and you learn.)

One thing you can do to support migrants and refugees. Ep. 44

January 12, 2018

It is not the first time and it is unlikely to be the last time, but President Trump’s latest racist remarks about “shithole” countries has many of asking: Who are we? What do we stand for? Who do we welcome and why?

We recorded this episode on Wednesday before the news about the president’s comments broke, but nonetheless we think a lot of what we talk about with this week’s guest will help you channel the anger you might feel toward practical steps to help migrants and refugees.

This Sunday the Catholic Church marks the 2018 World Day of Migrants and Refugees, and Jesuitical is marking that by talking with Giulia McPherson. Giulia is the director of advocacy and operations at Jesuit Refugee Service/USA, where she works on policy for refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced persons.

J.R.S./USA is using the World Day of Migrants and Refugees to let people know there are things they can do to respond to Pope Francis’ call to welcome the stranger with a campaign called #Do1Thing.

Before the interview, we tackle some other Catholic news from the week: Pope Francis is talking about the devil again before his trip to Latin America; Lady Bird wins a Golden Globe; and Trump’s recent immigration decisions are closing Catholic resettlement programs.

What have you been doing to support migrants and refugees? Do you have New Year’s resolution? Let us know by sending us an email at, follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow or leave us a comment here.

Links from the show:

Bullying is the devil’s work, pope says at morning Mass

Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ is a rallying cry for Catholic schoolgirls everywhere

Pope Francis’ message for World Day of Migrants and Refugees

New Trump refugee policies could close more than 20 Catholic Charities resettlement offices

Catholic leaders call ending T.P.S. for Salvadorans a ‘lose-lose’ decision

What’s on tap?

French 75

1 oz gin, 1/2 oz lemon juice, 1/2 oz simple syrup, 2 oz champagne