Sister Simone Campbell on Paul Ryan, religious life, and the political issues driving her crazy right now Ep. 36

October 27, 2017
00:0000:00

This week, we talk with celebrity nun, Sister Simone Campbell. Sister Simone is the leader of the Nuns on the Bus and executive director of the NETWORK Lobby for Catholic Social Justice. We talk balancing spirituality with fame, women religious, Catholic feminism, Paul Ryan and more. 

In Signs of the Times, next week is Halloween, and some women religious warn: sexy nun costumes aren’t funny. Half of U.S. citizens don’t think you need to believe in God to be a good person—what exactly does it mean to be good? Have you heard of the Palmarian Catholic Church? Well, Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code and infamous for getting Catholicism wrong, has a new book out focusing on the creepy, Catholic sect (as a bonus, you guys get to hear about Zac’s schismatic church rabbit hole). Earlier this year, the Vatican released a survey in anticipation of next year’s Synod 2018 on Young People, the Faith, and Vocational Discernment. The three of us took the survey back in July on episode 20. Since then, the survey now has over 60,000 responses. 

And finally, earlier this year, Bill O’Reilly was fired from Fox News after several women came forward and accused him of sexual harassment. This week, O’Reilly, who is Catholic, claims that he is “mad at God” over the way he has been treated. This comes in light of similar allegations against Harvey Weinstein, James Toback and Terry Richardson. We talk about the right way for men to talk about sexual harassment and assault, toxic masculinity, the power of the #MeToo social media movement and more. (Editor's note: In the episode we say that Alyssa Milano started the #metoo campaign, but she actually just reignited it—Tarana Burke is the founder of the movement.)

As always, we love to hear from our listeners. Make sure to follow us on Twitter, @jesuiticalshow or send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org. And please make sure to subscribe—and tell everyone you know to do it also—to us on iTunes. While you’re there, please leave us a review, and we’ll make sure to shout you out during one of our episodes. 

P.S., we’re moving this week, so there won’t be a new jesuitical dropping next week. However, we’re back the second week of November with Tommy Tighe, author of The Catholic Hipster Handbook: Rediscovering Cool Saints, Forgotten Prayers, and Other Weird but Sacred Stuff.

Links from the show: 

Why your ‘sexy nun’ costume isn’t funny
Half of U.S. Catholics say belief in God is not necessary to be a good person
Dan Brown’s new target? The creepy Catholic sect with its very own pope and ‘Vatican’
Bill O'Reilly ‘mad at God’ over sexual misconduct allegations
Pre-Synod Survey has 65,000 responses (L’Osservatore Romano)
Can the Catholic Church keep millennials from passing it by?
I’m a Jesuit. How should I respond to toxic masculinity and #MeToo?

What’s on tap?

Since we’re moving, we drank whatever we had left in our fridge: Sierra Nevada Oktoberfest 

Do you know why you’re Catholic? Ep. 35

October 20, 2017
00:0000:00

“What does religion have to offer me?” It’s a question more people are asking as affiliation with organized religion continues to fall. Brandon Vogt thinks that Catholics should be ready with answers.

“Today, as the world becomes more and more disinterested and disenchanted with religion, we need this positive approach [to being Catholic more] than a negative defense,” he says.

Vogt, the guest on this week’s episode of Jesuitical, is the author of Why I am Catholic (And You Should Be Too). In it, Vogt recounts his conversion to Catholicism and the arguments that convinced him to enter the church. He also outlines arguments he thinks will convince those skeptical of what the Catholic Church teaches.

Before the interview with Vogt, we summarize and discuss the top Catholic news stories of the week: A cardboard cutout of Pope Francis goes missing; some prisoners break out of jail when they’re supposed to meet the pope; are there changes coming to the church’s teaching on the death penalty?

Jesuitical is a weekly podcast from the young, lay editors of America. You can listen to it on iTunes here, in the embedded player at the top of this page or wherever you find your favorite podcasts. If you like the show, please consider leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. If you don’t know how, that’s O.K.! Tweet one of the hosts and we’ll be happy to help (@AshleyMcKinless , @OlgaMSegura , @ZacDayvis).

Links from the show:

Life-size Pope cutout stolen from church returned intact

Pope invites prisoners to lunch, they break free instead

Pope Francis: The death penalty is contrary to the Gospel

Mexican state plans $4.2 million 147-foot Our Lady of Guadalupe statue

Holy spirits: Closed churches find second life as breweries

Baltimore middle-schoolers’ viral rendition of ‘Rise Up’ helps soothe a troubled nation

What’s on tap? Pisco Sour

1 oz lemon juice, 1 egg white, 1 1/2 oz Pisco, 3/4 oz simple syrup

Catholic feminism is not an oxymoron Ep 34

October 13, 2017
00:0000:00

What does it mean to be a feminist? I wasn’t raised one—I barely even understood what the word meant growing up. It wasn’t until my 20s that I began to fully engage with feminist ideas and literature, from Betty Friedan to bell hooks to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. For me, feminism is intersectional, incorporating various aspects of my identity: being a woman of color, an immigrant, a writer, and a person of faith.

This week, in a women’s only episode—Zac is on a much deserved vacation—Ashley and I discuss our personal relationships with the feminist label, Catholicism and more with this week’s guest, Claire Swinarski. A former FOCUS missionary, Claire is the host of “The Catholic Feminist Podcast.”

And, in Signs of the Times, Pope Francis reaches 40 million followers on Twitter. U2’s Bono (mistakenly?) takes the Eucharist after a concert in Colombia. Does inviting someone to speak at your university explicitly mean you support everything they stand for? We analyze this question by looking at Nick Cannon’s performance at Georgian Court University in New Jersey and Charles Koch’s lecture at Catholic University.

And finally, in some nun news, a new reality television series invites women to swap the club for the convent; and “Nundos,” a nun-run pop-up restaurant, invites millennials in for free food—but you’ve got to leave your phone at the door.

As always, we want to hear from you. Follow us Twitter @jesuiticalshow or send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org. And pretty, pretty please leave us a rating and review on iTunes!

Links from the show:

Pope tops 40 million followers on Twitter, 5 million on Instagram

U2’s Bono (Mistakenly?) Receives Eucharist at Mass After Concert in Colombia

Nick Cannon upsets Georgian Court University with controversial performance

Koch, Turkson speak at Catholic University's ‘Good Profit’ conference

Party girls’ sent to live in convent for reality TV show

A Nun-Run Pop-Up Restaurant Called 'Nundos' Is Funny But Not a Joke

What’s on tap?

The Kevin Ahern, which contains mint, 1 ounce St. Germain, 2 ounces of bourbon, 3 dashes of bitters (for trinity) and a squeeze of some lemon for the bitterness of sin mix with ice. Kevin invented this drink in honor of the church in Paris called St Germain Des Pres.

Matt Maher: Jesuit spirituality could save the world Ep. 33

October 6, 2017
00:0000:00

Even super fans (your hosts included) of Grammy-nominated Christian artist Matt Maher may not know this fun fact: The Canadian musician went to a Jesuit high school in Newfoundland! On this week’s episode, we ask Matt if Ignatian spirituality has influenced his music, how the music industry has changed since he released his first album in 2001 and about the place of protest and suffering in his latest album, “Echoes,” which dropped on Sept. 29.

In Signs of the Times, we talk about how we, as individuals and a country, responded to the horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas. Are thoughts and prayers enough? Is this the right time to talk about gun control?

Next, a former ESPN employee fired for writing a racist headline and about to become a Catholic priest show the power of second chances. And in other sports news, a Catholic diocese decrees that student athletes and spectators cannot take a knee during the national anthem. Also, they might have found Santa’s grave (and you might want to cover the kiddos’ ears). Finally, 40 Catholic groups marked the Feast of St. Francis Assisi (Oct. 4) by announcing a record divestment from fossil fuels.

As always, we want to hear from you. Follow us Twitter @jesuiticalshow or send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org. And pretty, pretty please leave us a rating and review on iTunes!

Links from the show

Pope Francis offers prayers for the dead and injured in Las Vegas shooting
Fired by ESPN for a racist headline, he’s finding his second chance as a Catholic priest
LI diocese: Students, spectators must not kneel during national anthem
SANTA IS DEAD
Catholic Church to make record divestment from fossil fuels

What’s on tap?

Sierra Nevada Oktoberfest